Katie Greenaway

About Me

I am a Senior Lecturer and Research Fellow based at the University of Melbourne, Australia. My research focuses on social functioning in three main domains: identity processes, emotion regulation, and human agency.

I completed my PhD at the University of Queensland before taking up a position as Global Scholar with the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Global Fellow Academy. The Academy brings together elite early career researchers in all areas of science to build research and leadership capacity in young scholars. I worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Queensland before beginning an Australian Research Council DECRA fellowship in 2016. I moved to the University of Melbourne in 2017 and began an ARC Future Fellowship in 2020.

You can download my CV here.

57
Publications
1939
Citations
7018
Flat white coffees

Featured Publications

Group identification enhances perceived personal control with consequences for health and well-being, JPSP

People can feel more personally in control when they belong to a group

When trust goes wrong: A social identity model of risk taking, JPSP

Sometimes the people you trust the most can pose the greatest risk

Winners are grinners, JESP

Showing positive emotion after a win can make you seem unlikeable, but it also makes you seem high status

Social identity mapping online, JPSP

Visually mapping out our identities can make us happier and healthier

The source model of group threat, American Psychologist

What can Aliens and Zombies teach us about human psychology?

Context shapes social judgments of positive emotion expression and suppression, Emotion

Showing positive emotion may be a good way to win friends and influence people, but are there times when it’s better to suppress than express?

My Research

Identity

Feeling socially connected is one of the most important ingredients to a happy, healthy, and productive life. My research demonstrates the functional benefits of group identification for  health, well-being, communication, and productivity. Read more.

Emotion

Positive emotion is good, but can you have too much of a good thing? My research shows the personal and social costs of experiencing and expressing certain positive emotions, and the occasional social benefits of suppressing positive emotion. Read more.

Head

Agency

Humans have a fundamental need to feel in control of their lives. My research reveals the psychological lengths to which people will go to maintain perceived control by altering perception, motivation, and behaviour. Read more.

Presentations

Social identities satisfy psychological needs

Social identities satisfy psychological needs

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Shared identity promotes effective communication

Shared identity promotes effective communication

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Why do social networks make us healthy?

Why do social networks make us healthy?

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Latest Grants

Enhancing Social Connectedness

Enhancing Social Connectedness

Future Fellowship, Australian Research Council
This grant investigates why social connections are good for well-being, conceptualizing this as a process that involves successful regulation of emotions and behaviour.
Rethinking Positive Emotion Regulation

Rethinking Positive Emotion Regulation

DECRA Fellowship, Australian Research Council

This grant investigates whether the positive emotions we think bring us closer can actually worsen social relations, with implications for development of shared identity and personal well-being.

Secrecy in Everyday Life

Secrecy in Everyday Life

Discovery Project, Australian Research Council
This grant unites researchers from social psychology and management to explore the strategies people use to keep secrets in their everyday lives, and the impact of these strategies on well-being.
Dashed Hopes in Eduction

Dashed Hopes in Eduction

Creativity Grant, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

This grant unites research perspectives from social psychology and sociology to investigate how students cope with failing to achieve their academic goals. Co-investiged by Margaret Frye.

Latest news from Katie

News

Winners are Grinners

Winners are Grinners

I had a great time chatting with Hilary Harper on Life Matters today about the costs and benefits of expressing positive emotions in victory! You can listen to our discussion here or read more about the research that inspired it here.

The Cost of Keeping Secrets

The Cost of Keeping Secrets

I’m delighted to announce a new line of work funded by an ARC Discovery Project with Dr Elise Kalokerinos of the University of Newcastle, and Dr Michael Slepian and Professor Adam Galinsky of Columbia University. The project will investigate the psychological impact of keeping secrets in everyday life. You can hear more about this project…

SESP Symposium in Seattle

SESP Symposium in Seattle

I’m excited for our symposium on Psychology in Everyday Life at SESP in Seattle this week. Four excellent presenters will talk about how experience sampling can be used to inform psychological science in multiple domains. We’ll be presenting in Princessa II from 4:50-6pm on Friday 5 October. Psychology in Everyday Life The richness of human…

APS Rising Star Award

APS Rising Star Award

I was honoured to be named a Rising Star by the Association for Psychological Science, an award presented to outstanding psychological scientists in the earliest stages of their research careers. I was particularly proud and grateful to be named alongside my peers and friends, including my colleague at the University of Melbourne Pete Koval. This…

SESP Symposium

SESP Symposium

I really enjoyed taking part in a symposium organised by Serena Does and Margaret Shih on the 2016 US Presidential Election.   Michael Slepian presented data on why and how people kept their votes secret, and the implications of this for emotional well-being. I presented data showing that political group identification – usually a source…

SASP Symposium and Award

SASP Symposium and Award

I’m excited to be presenting my research in a symposium organised by Pete Koval at the Society of Australasian Social Psychologists in April. The symposium covers recent advancements in the study of emotion regulation, and features a great line-up of speakers, including Luke Smillie, Cindy Harmon-Jones, Sean Murphy, Carolyn MacCann, Pete Koval, and Brock Bastian.…

EASP Symposium on Putting Emotions in Context

EASP Symposium on Putting Emotions in Context

I will present in a symposium at the upcoming European Association for Social Psychology conference in Granada, Spain in July 2017. Abstract Context both produces emotion and shapes emotion: how it is expressed, regulated, and perceived. However, in practice, research often examines emotion processes without considering the important contextual factors that shape them, missing nuance that is vital to…

EASP Symposium on Applying the Social Cure

EASP Symposium on Applying the Social Cure

I will chair a symposium at the upcoming European Association for Social Psychology conference in Granada, Spain in July 2017. Abstract An impressive body of work now shows that strong social connections—and the social identities they afford—have significant health and well-being benefits. Yet practitioners and policy makers are often at a loss for how to translate this research…

I'm currently researching from

Melbourne